AIM Spring 2016 Newsletter


aim alert
Spring 2016 - In This Issue:
boys at a farm
   
UPCOMING ASTHMA EVENTS
APRIL
 
13 - Clearing the Air on Asthma,   10 a.m.- noon, Mich. Center for Urban African American Aging Research, 420 S. Leigh, Detroit. Asthma & allergy discussion. Kathleen Slonager for more info

MAY 
12 "The Respiratory Immune System," Traverse City dinner lecture, 6 to 8 p.m., Grand Traverse Resort & Spa, Traverse City, MI. Karen Kain for more info

JUNE
AIM Partnership Forum, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., LCC West Campus, 5708 Cornerstone Dr., Lansing, MI. John Dowling for more info
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AE-C® Recert Changes
 
The NAECB recently made significant changes in the AE-C® recertification process: 
  • If your certification is about to expire, you can recertify by CEUs instead of taking the examination, if you meet the recertification by CEU requirements.

     
  • If your certification has already expired, you can still recertify by CEUs by meeting the recertification by CEU requirements within a grace period and paying a late fee. 
  • If your credential is 2 or more years past its expiration date, you will be eligible to recertify by examination ONLY.
Being Active with Asthma
by Karla Stoermer-Grossman & Candice Lee 
With Michigan's spring finally arriving, now is the perfect time to get more active. But for some people, exercise can trigger
shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing and tiredness. You might think these symptoms are from being out of shape or out of practice, but you may really have exercise induced bronchospasm or EIB, like many Olympic athletes!

If you have asthma, coughing or other symptoms of asthma with exercise is a sign that your asthma is not well controlled. If you do not have asthma, and you find that you are coughing with exercise, but not from colds or other asthma triggers, you could have EIB. Coughing with exercise is the most common sign of EIB, and may be your only symptom. Usually, EIB symptoms begin during exercise and may get worse 5 to 10 minutes after stopping exercise. A "second wave" of asthma symptoms can happen up to twelve hours after stopping exercise.

What causes EIB? At rest, you usually breathe in through your nose where the air is warmed and moistened.When you exercise, you breathe faster and deeper, and more often through your mouth. This makes the air dryer and cooler, which can trigger your airways to tighten  (bronchoconstriction). Other triggers that can make EIB symptoms worse:
  • high pollution levels
  • high pollen counts
  • exposure to irritants, such as smoke and strong fumes
  • a recent cold or asthma episode
But, EIB should not keep people from exercising or being active. Exercise helps people reduce stress, lose weight, and prevent or
improve other chronic conditions. People who have asthma should be as active as they want to be when their asthma is under control. It's important to work with your doctor to make sure your asthma is under good control, and to help rule out any other conditions that could be making exercise difficult. Swimming, walking, biking, and volleyball are great for people with asthma, but it's best to find a form of exercise that fits your current level of fitness.  

EnhanceFitness (or EF) is one great option. EF is a group exercise class for adults offered throughout the state. EF is taught by trained instructors who adjust the exercises to meet you at your current level of fitness. People in any physical condition can join EF; it can even be done seated. EF classes address cardio, flexibility and strength training. People who regularly attend EnhanceFitness classes can expect to become more active, energized, and empowered to be more independent. Learn more about EnhanceFitness and find a class near you. 

Exercise induced bronchospasm can be treated by taking the right medications at the right times, and making some minor changes to your workout routine. Jump into spring with your asthma under control, and be as active as you want to be!

Karla Stoermer-Grossman, MSA, BSN, RN, AE-C, is a Clinical Care Coordinator for the Children's Asthma Wellness Program in the Pediatric Pulmonology DIvision of C.S. Mott Children's Hospital.

Candice Lee, MSA, is a Public Health Consultant with the Arthritis Program at the Michigan Department of Health & Human Services. 
World Asthma Day/Asthma Month Activity Help
                    
Does your organization need ideas and tips for planning and
running powerful community events or other activities
to celebrate 
Asthma Awareness Month (May) or World
Asthma Day (May 3)? There is still time!

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) created
an Event Planning Kit to help you spread the word about
common asthma triggers and the best ways to control asthma, including things that can be done with little planning or funds. Download your free kit today!
 

For more information about asthma in Michigan:
 visit the  AIM Website or contact Tisa Vorce